Two means of disseminating nursing research outcomes

Disseminating Your Findings Disseminating Your Findings In this module, strategies to effectively disseminate research findings to the appropriate audience will be discussed. Identify the appropriate audience for the particular research findings. List the most appropriate methods of dissemination for that type of audience. Identify the most common barriers and strategies for eliminating them.

Two means of disseminating nursing research outcomes

Full-text papers assessed for eligibility but excluded from the review. This file includes details of full-text papers assessed for eligibility but excluded from the review.

Abstract Background Addressing deficiencies in the dissemination and transfer of research-based knowledge into routine clinical practice is high on the policy agenda both in the UK and internationally.

However, there is lack of clarity between funding agencies as to what represents dissemination. Moreover, the expectations and guidance provided to researchers vary from one agency to another.

To be included, papers had to present an explicit framework or plan either designed for use by researchers or that could be used to guide dissemination activity. Papers which mentioned dissemination but did not provide any detail in the context of a wider knowledge translation framework, were excluded.

References were screened independently by at least two reviewers; disagreements were resolved by discussion. A narrative synthesis was undertaken. Results Thirty-three frameworks met our inclusion criteria, 20 of which were designed to be used by researchers to guide their dissemination activities.

Twenty-eight included frameworks were underpinned at least in part by one or more of three different theoretical approaches, namely persuasive communication, diffusion of innovations theory, and social marketing. Conclusions There are currently a number of theoretically-informed frameworks available to researchers that can be used to help guide their dissemination planning and activity.

Given the current emphasis on Two means of disseminating nursing research outcomes the uptake of knowledge about the effects of interventions into routine practice, funders could consider encouraging researchers to adopt a theoretically-informed approach to their research dissemination.

Background Healthcare resources are finite, so it is imperative that the delivery of high-quality healthcare is ensured through the successful implementation of cost-effective health technologies. However, there is growing recognition that the full potential for research evidence to improve practice in healthcare settings, either in relation to clinical practice or to managerial practice and decision making, is not yet realised.

Addressing deficiencies in the dissemination and transfer of research-based knowledge to routine clinical practice is high on the policy agenda both in the UK [ 1 - 5 ] and internationally [ 6 ]. As interest in the research to practice gap has increased, so too has the terminology used to describe the approaches employed [ 78 ].

Diffusion, dissemination, implementation, knowledge transfer, knowledge mobilisation, linkage and exchange, and research into practice are all being used to describe overlapping and interrelated concepts and practices. In this review, we have used the term dissemination, which we view as a key element in the research to practice knowledge translation continuum.

We define dissemination as a planned process that involves consideration of target audiences and the settings in which research findings are to be received and, where appropriate, communicating and interacting with wider policy and health service audiences in ways that will facilitate research uptake in decision-making processes and practice.

Most applied health research funding agencies expect and demand some commitment or effort on the part of grant holders to disseminate the findings of their research. However, there does appear to be a lack of clarity between funding agencies as to what represents dissemination [ 9 ].

Moreover, although most consider dissemination to be a shared responsibility between those funding and those conducting the research, the expectations on and guidance provided to researchers vary from one agency to another [ 9 ].

Two means of disseminating nursing research outcomes

We have previously highlighted the need for researchers to consider carefully the costs and benefits of dissemination and have raised concerns about the nature and variation in type of guidance issued by funding bodies to their grant holders and applicants [ 10 ].

Against this background, we have performed a systematic scoping review with the following two aims: Methods The following databases were searched to identify potential studies for inclusion: The search terms were identified through discussion by the research team, by scanning background literature, and by browsing database thesauri.

There were no methodological, language, or date restrictions. Details of the database specific search strategies are presented Additional File 1Appendix 1. As this review was undertaken as part of a wider project aiming to assess the dissemination activity of UK applied and public health researchers [ 16 ], we searched the websites of 10 major UK funders of health services and public health research.

We also interrogated the websites of four key agencies with an established record in the field of dissemination and knowledge transfer. As a number of databases and websites were searched, some degree of duplication resulted. In order to manage this issue, the titles and abstracts of records were downloaded and imported into EndNote bibliographic software, and duplicate records removed.

References were screened independently by two reviewers; those studies that did not meet the inclusion criteria were excluded. Where it was not possible to exclude articles based on title and abstract alone, full text versions were obtained and their eligibility was assessed independently by two reviewers.

Where disagreements occurred, the opinion of a third reviewer was sought and resolved by discussion and arbitration by a third reviewer. To be eligible for inclusion, papers needed to either present an explicit framework or plan designed to be used by a researcher to guide their dissemination activity, or an explicit framework or plan that referred to dissemination in the context of a wider knowledge translation framework but that provided enough detail on the dissemination elements that a researcher could then use it.

Papers that referred to dissemination in the context of a wider knowledge translation framework, but that did not describe in any detail those process elements relating to dissemination were excluded from the review. A list of excluded papers is included in Additional File 2Appendix 2.

For each included paper we recorded the publication date, a description of the main elements of the framework, whether there was any reference to other included studies, and whether there was an explicit theoretical basis to the framework.

Included papers that did not make an explicit reference to an underlying theory were re-examined to determine whether any implicit use of theory could be identified.Nursing organisations: Specific to the type of research, for example the College of Emergency Nursing Australasia or the Society of Trauma Nurses.

What is knowledge translation? Knowledge translation is the process through which research knowledge is created, circulated and adopted into clinical practice. Nov 22,  · The final framework is derived from Two Communities Theory and proposes pragmatic strategies for communicating across conflicting cultures research and policy; it suggests a shift away from simple one-way communication of research to researchers developing collaborative relationships with .

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Dissemination of nursing knowledge is essential for advanced practice nurses. Being able to contribute, effectively use, and communicate knowledge to nurses, interdisciplinary colleagues, policy makers and. Strategies for Disseminating Research Findings - This PDF file contains a comprehensive discussion of various ways in which research may disseminate research findings.

Beyond the traditional journal articles and presentations, this resources discusses press releases, policy briefs, newsletters, flyers and many other methods for releasing information.

Volume 8, No. 3, Art. 17 – September Strategies for Disseminating Qualitative Research Findings: Three Exemplars. Steven Keen & Les Todres. Abstract: Assuming there are those who do pay attention to the dissemination of qualitative research findings, what can we learn from them?For this article, we searched for examples of qualitative research where findings have been disseminated.

Discuss the preparation of a research report 2.

Disseminating Your Findings - Center for Innovation in Research and Teaching

Describe two means of presenting research results at professional meetings 3. Explore the steps in publishing a journal article only pertinent studies are mentioned. AORN VI Research Findings and Nursing Practice.

AORN Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, Nursing